At Power Innovations, we wake up every day moving the world towards a greener future. And it’s good to see the size of the opportunity that is available to companies that will innovate, nurture, and service renewable energy solutions.  

informationisbeautiful David McCandless, Duncan Geere, Stephanie Tomasevic, Fabio Bergamaschi

Source: informationisbeautiful David McCandless, Duncan Geere, Stephanie Tomasevic, Fabio Bergamaschi

Looking at the bottom of this infographic (above), we can begin to imagine where the potential for wind and solar energy. By using only one half of 1% of the potential available energy from solar and only .8% of the available energy from wind, we are missing out on the enormous potential of either source to become a significant contributor to our quest for energy independence and to meet corporate, state, federal and international goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. 

informationisbeautiful David McCandless, Duncan Geere, Stephanie Tomasevic, Fabio Bergamaschi

Source: informationisbeautiful David McCandless, Duncan Geere, Stephanie Tomasevic, Fabio Bergamaschi

Another observation is how intensive the usage of electricity is by industries with extensive compute power.  Hidden in the middle of the infographic (right) is a couple of small rows showing the daily energy consumption of Google and Bitcoin.  Google alone requires more than 1.5 times all of the energy produced daily by the Hoover Dam — and more than 2X the production of energy from the largest operational offshore wind farm in the world.

The challenge, and thus the opportunity, is not just to increase the usage of solar and wind but to envision their roles as part of an energy supply chain, economic engine for job creation, and a transformative force for corporations and governments to operate more efficiently. And the key to that is to harness and store the energy from solar and wind. That’s exactly where Hydrogen steps in.

When we need power is not normally the same time there’s wind or solar. That results in large amounts of this renewable energy going to waste. Because storing energy in a battery isn’t efficient and the power degrades over time.

Conversely, hydrogen fuel cells deliver the ability with the fuel cell to manage our energy needs. With hydrogen, there is no shelf life – that hydrogen never goes bad. You can use an electrolyzer to extract hydrogen when renewable energy production is high and then use that hydrogen to produce electricity when variable renewable energy production is low.

In short, Hydrogen allows us to manage energy resources so that we can implement them in a  way that meets our needs on a day-to-day basis. Hydrogen is the building block of generating, managing, and storing energy in the most efficient way possible.